Bengaluru’s Tech Parks Need to Stay Open For Its Micro-Economies to Survive

By Divina Ann Philipose, Bharat Hegde & Manasi Nene 

Bengaluru and Technology are almost synonymous with each other; the bustling city is at the heart of India’s technology prowess, with major global and Indian conglomerates, legacy companies and startups, all finding a home here. And that this happened is no accident. Several different state governments & the city of Bengaluru itself have created the necessary incentives and infrastructure to make this happen. One such infrastructural commodity that has been at the centre of this journey, has been Tech Parks. 

These hubs—essentially massive office complexes—house thousands of employees, and some of the biggest Tech Parks have hundreds of thousands employed with the different companies which have offices there. For instance, ~150,000 employees work at Manyata Tech Park, for companies like Philips, Rolls Royce, IBM, Larsen & Toubro and many more.

But with the COVID-19 induced lockdowns coming into place, a large number of employees went back to their hometowns, and more and more companies shifted to a flexible or work-from-home setting. This, in turn, impacted the Tech Parks, with several having shut down, and others still struggling to fill in their capacity. But there’s a larger, more widespread impact that the shuttering of these Tech Parks have.

There are hundreds of smaller businesses in and around Tech Parks that have been severely impacted. From your local tea stalls and restaurants to travel agencies and housing accommodations like PGs, hundreds of businesses are struggling to get back on their feet, with a fair number having shut shop. Divina Ann Philipose, Manasi Nene and Bharat Hegde went to visit some of these businesses, and shed light on the impact of the lockdowns on the micro-economies around Tech Parks.

Divina is a writer, graphic designer, and photographer in the making. She likes to look at how gender impacts conservation, public health, and the representation of gender in media. She is also of the strong opinion that drinking a particular hot beverage is unnecessary, much to the disagreement of everyone at The Bastion. Pablo, the office dog, however, agrees. Divina is an intern at The Bastion.
Manasi is a writer, filmmaker, and musician who is keen on exploring issues of education, technology and community mental health. She has also been active in the beatboxing and slam poetry communities of India. Off-the-clock, she can be found cycling, daydreaming, or daydreaming about cycling. Manasi works as The Bastion's Multimedia Associate.
As a graduate in journalism from Christ (Deemed to be University), Bharat has always had a passion to search for and report on issues faced by our citizens. He likes telling stories that not many others are willing to tell, and believes that truth does exist, regardless of the different narratives that can be spun off from it.

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